Untitled
true2myroots:

How I rise up every mawning….Alkelbulan Rise

true2myroots:

How I rise up every mawning….Alkelbulan Rise

contradictive-paradox:

pixelatedboobs:

Mcm

Mce
shesthedifferencemaker:

I really like this picture.  Whenever we see pics of people doing black girls hair, there is always frowning and angry faces like its such a struggle.
Here the little girl is smiling and content while her mother(??) is gently and patiently tending to her hair.
It’s nice.

shesthedifferencemaker:

I really like this picture.  Whenever we see pics of people doing black girls hair, there is always frowning and angry faces like its such a struggle.

Here the little girl is smiling and content while her mother(??) is gently and patiently tending to her hair.

It’s nice.

cultureunseen:

Jazz is…

 1.  Dexter Gordon
 2.  Pearl Bailey
 3.  Big Jay McNeely
 4.  Ella Fitzgerald
 5.  Art Blakey
 6.  Sonny Stitt
 7.  Billie Holiday
 8.  Charles Mingus
 9.  Miles Davis
10. John Coltrane

ourafrica:

& I am proud.

ourafrica:

& I am proud.

dorothydandridge:

"In the end, she [Dorothy Dandridge] may have believed she had failed, as she felt so often throughout her life. But a generation of Black Americans always remembered her accomploshments and her extraordinary presence on the cultural landscape. She had boldly cleared a path for the dramatic Black film actress and with her death, there was a void in American popular films. Later generations rediscovered her, and eventually influenced a new era of Black actresses and actors working in the movies, who understood her struggles and valued her achievements. She had done far more than she had ever realized." - Donald Bogle

dorothydandridge:

"In the end, she [Dorothy Dandridge] may have believed she had failed, as she felt so often throughout her life. But a generation of Black Americans always remembered her accomploshments and her extraordinary presence on the cultural landscape. She had boldly cleared a path for the dramatic Black film actress and with her death, there was a void in American popular films. Later generations rediscovered her, and eventually influenced a new era of Black actresses and actors working in the movies, who understood her struggles and valued her achievements. She had done far more than she had ever realized." - Donald Bogle

mansap:

Can u read lips ?

nostalgiagolden:

Young Dorothy Dandridge in the 1940s. A beautiful star in the making…

cultureunseen:

The Black Panthers ‘Black Community News Service’…

cultureunseen:

Ernie Paniccioli - Graffiti and Hip Hop Photographer extraordinaire!

http://www.hiphopotherside.com/

cultureunseen:

1st Salute to The Jackson 5